1840 Journal

Meet the artisans, discover their expertise, and share their passion.

Creators

Interior Ecology.

Designer Shane Krepakevich honed his skills over the course of a decade that he spent in the contemporary art field. He originally studied geology before turning to Fine Arts. It was then that he started working independently as an artist, first in painting and later in sculpture. "I gained a structural thinking from geology, a sense of the possible from art, and a love of form and materials from both,” he explains. His background has informed his work as he has continued to explore new formats, working with design and art as complementary tools. As a result, Mercury Bureau’s creations will work well with any décor that’s minimalist or Scandinavian in style, like the creations of La Fabrique Déco or Kroft.

Objects of Design

According to Shane Krepakevich, the one thing that interests him about design, coming from the context of art, is the different ways that we engage with design objects, especially those that are part of our homes. “Being able to repeatedly interact with an object over the course of days, months, and years makes for a different relationship—especially when we can touch and hold that object, when it becomes enmeshed in an ecosystem of other objects and the architecture that contains them, when we see an object ageing and changing,” he says. “I love the complex life of an object of design as it becomes intertwined with our own.”

 

Interior Moods

Since humans spend most of their lives indoors, the interiors we inhabit strongly influence our experience of the world, just as our clothing impacts our moods. Each room is an amalgam of its architecture, surface finishes, light, as well as the objects within it. As a designer, Shake Krepakevich tries to imagine how each creation will contribute to this interior ecology and he aims to produce objects that are compelling in their material, form, and function so that the experience of them can be as engaging as possible.

Minimalist Design: The Making Of 

 Describing “Mesa Dish,” the latest in a series of bronze vide-poches, the designer says, With each new vide-poche, I take a different approach to form. I wanted to create something that was as much a pedestal as a vessel. I started with a piece of soft but robust foam and hand carved a form that was roughly flat on top and tapered and rounded on the bottom. I then had a local foundry cast this hand-carved form using a sand mold. This gives the piece a sandy, irregular texture as well as pitting from the pouring of the bronze. Finally, I polish the top surface of the dish using progressively finer grits of sandpaper, which results in an undulating, radiant mirror finish.”

 

Looking for more minimalist and Scandinavian styles? Discover other designers with a similar aesthetic like YYY and mpgmb.

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